astronomy-to-zoology:

Acutalis tartarea
…is a species of membracid treehopper that is widely distributed throughout central and eastern North America. Adult A. tartarea are typically active from May through October, and are active on a variety of host plants. Which typically consist of black locust, ragweed, and various sunflower and goldenrod species. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hemiptera-Auchenorrhyncha-Cicadoidea-Membracidae-Smilinae-Aculatini-Acutalis-A. tartarea
Image: Me

astronomy-to-zoology:

Acutalis tartarea

…is a species of membracid treehopper that is widely distributed throughout central and eastern North America. Adult A. tartarea are typically active from May through October, and are active on a variety of host plants. Which typically consist of black locust, ragweed, and various sunflower and goldenrod species. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hemiptera-Auchenorrhyncha-Cicadoidea-Membracidae-Smilinae-Aculatini-Acutalis-A. tartarea

Image: Me

bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info
bettybooplover:


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
Zoom Info

bettybooplover:

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

  • We all know that Betty Boop makes a small cameo in the Ink & Paint Club but she also appears at the end of the film. Here’s a closer look at Betty in the ending of the 1988 film WFRR. (In one scene she is very happy to see Jessica Rabbit, both sex symbols do not speak to one another in the film but it is referenced that they know one another as they work in the same club, as you can see Betty stands very close to Donald Duck, Tweety Pie and Bugs Bunny, and Donald can be seen getting a little too close, never less it’s wonderful to see Betty with other cartoons from other studios, Snow White also appears but is far away from Betty, and is blocked by other cartoons, like a bear for example.  I also noticed something weird when Betty gets near Bugs and the carrot… but no comment on that one!)
lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day
Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.
Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.
The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.
Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Zoom Info
lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day
Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.
Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.
The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.
Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Zoom Info
lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day
Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.
Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.
The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.
Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Zoom Info
lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day
Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.
Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.
The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.
Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Zoom Info

lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

libutron:

Kimberley Rock Monitor  (Glauert’s Monitor)
This long-necked monitor lizard is commonly known as the Kimberley Rock Monitor, and has the scientific name of Varanus glauerti (Varanidae).
Varanus glauerti is a medium-sized monitor (up to 80 cm in length) which occupies rocky habitats, being both terrestrial or arboreal. Males and pairs often share the same tree, and even the same branch stub, with no evidence of agonistic behavior outside the breeding season. They are active foragers.  
This species is distributed from western Kimberley in Western Australia, to the northwestern tip of the Northern Territory (Australia).
References: [1] - [2]
Photo: ©Henry Cook
Locality: Kimberley, Western Australia

Ha! Its Joanna from the rescuers down under!!!

libutron:

Kimberley Rock Monitor  (Glauert’s Monitor)

This long-necked monitor lizard is commonly known as the Kimberley Rock Monitor, and has the scientific name of Varanus glauerti (Varanidae).

Varanus glauerti is a medium-sized monitor (up to 80 cm in length) which occupies rocky habitats, being both terrestrial or arboreal. Males and pairs often share the same tree, and even the same branch stub, with no evidence of agonistic behavior outside the breeding season. They are active foragers.  

This species is distributed from western Kimberley in Western Australia, to the northwestern tip of the Northern Territory (Australia).

References: [1] - [2]

Photo: ©Henry Cook

Locality: Kimberley, Western Australia

Ha! Its Joanna from the rescuers down under!!!

cool-critters:

Mata mata (Chelus fimbriata)
The Mata mata is a freshwater turtle found in South America, primarily in the Amazon and Orinoco basins. It is strictly an aquatic species but it prefers standing in shallow water where its snout can reach the surface to breathe. The appearance of the mata mata’s shell resembles a piece of bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves. The mata mata is carnivorous, feeding exclusively upon aquatic invertebrates and fish, which it has to swallow whole, since it cannot chew due to the way its mouth is constructed.
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cool-critters:

Mata mata (Chelus fimbriata)
The Mata mata is a freshwater turtle found in South America, primarily in the Amazon and Orinoco basins. It is strictly an aquatic species but it prefers standing in shallow water where its snout can reach the surface to breathe. The appearance of the mata mata’s shell resembles a piece of bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves. The mata mata is carnivorous, feeding exclusively upon aquatic invertebrates and fish, which it has to swallow whole, since it cannot chew due to the way its mouth is constructed.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Mata mata (Chelus fimbriata)
The Mata mata is a freshwater turtle found in South America, primarily in the Amazon and Orinoco basins. It is strictly an aquatic species but it prefers standing in shallow water where its snout can reach the surface to breathe. The appearance of the mata mata’s shell resembles a piece of bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves. The mata mata is carnivorous, feeding exclusively upon aquatic invertebrates and fish, which it has to swallow whole, since it cannot chew due to the way its mouth is constructed.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Mata mata (Chelus fimbriata)
The Mata mata is a freshwater turtle found in South America, primarily in the Amazon and Orinoco basins. It is strictly an aquatic species but it prefers standing in shallow water where its snout can reach the surface to breathe. The appearance of the mata mata’s shell resembles a piece of bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves. The mata mata is carnivorous, feeding exclusively upon aquatic invertebrates and fish, which it has to swallow whole, since it cannot chew due to the way its mouth is constructed.
Zoom Info

cool-critters:

Mata mata (Chelus fimbriata)

The Mata mata is a freshwater turtle found in South America, primarily in the Amazon and Orinoco basins. It is strictly an aquatic species but it prefers standing in shallow water where its snout can reach the surface to breathe. The appearance of the mata mata’s shell resembles a piece of bark, and its head resembles fallen leaves. The mata mata is carnivorous, feeding exclusively upon aquatic invertebrates and fish, which it has to swallow whole, since it cannot chew due to the way its mouth is constructed.

cool-critters:

Margay (Leopardus wiedii)
The Margay is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. Although it was once believed to be vulnerable to extinction, the IUCN now lists it as “Near Threatened”. The margay is found from southern Mexico, through Central America and in northern South America east of the Andes. The southern edge of its range reaches Uruguay and northern Argentina. They are found almost exclusively in areas of dense forest, ranging from tropical evergreen forest to tropical dry forest and high cloud forest. They are hunted mainly for their fur and this has resulted in a large population decrease - around 14,000 are killed a year. They also suffer from a loss of habitat, which is also a significant part of this decline.Of all of the felines, the Margay is most adapted for a true arboreal life. It is the only cat to possess the ability to rotate its hind legs 180° , enabling it to run head first down trees like squirrels. It can also hang from a branch by one hind foot! This cat eats small mammals (sometimes including monkeys), birds, eggs, lizards and tree frogs. It may also eat grass and other vegetation, most likely to help digestion.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Margay (Leopardus wiedii)
The Margay is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. Although it was once believed to be vulnerable to extinction, the IUCN now lists it as “Near Threatened”. The margay is found from southern Mexico, through Central America and in northern South America east of the Andes. The southern edge of its range reaches Uruguay and northern Argentina. They are found almost exclusively in areas of dense forest, ranging from tropical evergreen forest to tropical dry forest and high cloud forest. They are hunted mainly for their fur and this has resulted in a large population decrease - around 14,000 are killed a year. They also suffer from a loss of habitat, which is also a significant part of this decline.Of all of the felines, the Margay is most adapted for a true arboreal life. It is the only cat to possess the ability to rotate its hind legs 180° , enabling it to run head first down trees like squirrels. It can also hang from a branch by one hind foot! This cat eats small mammals (sometimes including monkeys), birds, eggs, lizards and tree frogs. It may also eat grass and other vegetation, most likely to help digestion.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Margay (Leopardus wiedii)
The Margay is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. Although it was once believed to be vulnerable to extinction, the IUCN now lists it as “Near Threatened”. The margay is found from southern Mexico, through Central America and in northern South America east of the Andes. The southern edge of its range reaches Uruguay and northern Argentina. They are found almost exclusively in areas of dense forest, ranging from tropical evergreen forest to tropical dry forest and high cloud forest. They are hunted mainly for their fur and this has resulted in a large population decrease - around 14,000 are killed a year. They also suffer from a loss of habitat, which is also a significant part of this decline.Of all of the felines, the Margay is most adapted for a true arboreal life. It is the only cat to possess the ability to rotate its hind legs 180° , enabling it to run head first down trees like squirrels. It can also hang from a branch by one hind foot! This cat eats small mammals (sometimes including monkeys), birds, eggs, lizards and tree frogs. It may also eat grass and other vegetation, most likely to help digestion.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Margay (Leopardus wiedii)
The Margay is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. Although it was once believed to be vulnerable to extinction, the IUCN now lists it as “Near Threatened”. The margay is found from southern Mexico, through Central America and in northern South America east of the Andes. The southern edge of its range reaches Uruguay and northern Argentina. They are found almost exclusively in areas of dense forest, ranging from tropical evergreen forest to tropical dry forest and high cloud forest. They are hunted mainly for their fur and this has resulted in a large population decrease - around 14,000 are killed a year. They also suffer from a loss of habitat, which is also a significant part of this decline.Of all of the felines, the Margay is most adapted for a true arboreal life. It is the only cat to possess the ability to rotate its hind legs 180° , enabling it to run head first down trees like squirrels. It can also hang from a branch by one hind foot! This cat eats small mammals (sometimes including monkeys), birds, eggs, lizards and tree frogs. It may also eat grass and other vegetation, most likely to help digestion.
Zoom Info

cool-critters:

Margay (Leopardus wiedii)

The Margay is a solitary and nocturnal animal that prefers remote sections of the rainforest. Although it was once believed to be vulnerable to extinction, the IUCN now lists it as “Near Threatened”. The margay is found from southern Mexico, through Central America and in northern South America east of the Andes. The southern edge of its range reaches Uruguay and northern Argentina. They are found almost exclusively in areas of dense forest, ranging from tropical evergreen forest to tropical dry forest and high cloud forest. They are hunted mainly for their fur and this has resulted in a large population decrease - around 14,000 are killed a year. They also suffer from a loss of habitat, which is also a significant part of this decline.Of all of the felines, the Margay is most adapted for a true arboreal life. It is the only cat to possess the ability to rotate its hind legs 180° , enabling it to run head first down trees like squirrels. It can also hang from a branch by one hind foot! This cat eats small mammals (sometimes including monkeys), birds, eggs, lizards and tree frogs. It may also eat grass and other vegetation, most likely to help digestion.

cool-critters:

Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox)
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. It is found solely in forested habitat, and actively hunts both by day and night. Over 50% of its diet consists of lemurs, the endemic primates found on the island; tenrecs, rodents, lizards, birds, and other animals are also documented as prey. Mating usually occurs in trees on horizontal limbs and can last for several hours. Except for mothers with young and occasional observations of pairs of males, animals are usually found alone, so that the species is considered solitary. Fossas communicate using sounds, scents, and visual signals. The fossa has been assessed as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN Red List since 2008. photo credits: Ran Kirlian, Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo, 
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cool-critters:

Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox)
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. It is found solely in forested habitat, and actively hunts both by day and night. Over 50% of its diet consists of lemurs, the endemic primates found on the island; tenrecs, rodents, lizards, birds, and other animals are also documented as prey. Mating usually occurs in trees on horizontal limbs and can last for several hours. Except for mothers with young and occasional observations of pairs of males, animals are usually found alone, so that the species is considered solitary. Fossas communicate using sounds, scents, and visual signals. The fossa has been assessed as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN Red List since 2008. photo credits: Ran Kirlian, Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo, 
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox)
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. It is found solely in forested habitat, and actively hunts both by day and night. Over 50% of its diet consists of lemurs, the endemic primates found on the island; tenrecs, rodents, lizards, birds, and other animals are also documented as prey. Mating usually occurs in trees on horizontal limbs and can last for several hours. Except for mothers with young and occasional observations of pairs of males, animals are usually found alone, so that the species is considered solitary. Fossas communicate using sounds, scents, and visual signals. The fossa has been assessed as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN Red List since 2008. photo credits: Ran Kirlian, Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo, 
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox)
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. It is found solely in forested habitat, and actively hunts both by day and night. Over 50% of its diet consists of lemurs, the endemic primates found on the island; tenrecs, rodents, lizards, birds, and other animals are also documented as prey. Mating usually occurs in trees on horizontal limbs and can last for several hours. Except for mothers with young and occasional observations of pairs of males, animals are usually found alone, so that the species is considered solitary. Fossas communicate using sounds, scents, and visual signals. The fossa has been assessed as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN Red List since 2008. photo credits: Ran Kirlian, Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo, 
Zoom Info

cool-critters:

Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox)

The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. It is found solely in forested habitat, and actively hunts both by day and night. Over 50% of its diet consists of lemurs, the endemic primates found on the island; tenrecs, rodents, lizards, birds, and other animals are also documented as prey. Mating usually occurs in trees on horizontal limbs and can last for several hours. Except for mothers with young and occasional observations of pairs of males, animals are usually found alone, so that the species is considered solitary. Fossas communicate using sounds, scents, and visual signals. The fossa has been assessed as “Vulnerable" by the IUCN Red List since 2008. photo credits: Ran Kirlian, Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol